BEAUTY Mom Health

Colloidal Silver During Pregnancy

Written by andy

Wondering if colloidal silver during pregnancy is safe? The experts weighed in:

Colloidal silver is often used as a dietary supplement, as it is believed to cure a wide range of ailments. Many people use it to treat parasites, viruses, bacteria, stomach ulcers, and yeast, as it’s supposed to be a powerful antiseptic agent. It’s also used for emphysema, bronchitis, cradle cap, impetigo, eczema, and a host of other conditions. Some people even use it to treat cancer, arthritis, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders like lupus.

Colloidal silver is a mineral that is not typically found in the human body and it is not considered to be an essential mineral,” explains Jamil Abdur-Rahman, M.D., FACOG, Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vista East Medical Center. “Studies have however found that silver ions have the ability to interact with the element sulfur. Sulfur is a key part of amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and protein conduct the majority of an organisms (i.e. a bacteria, a virus or a fungus) functions. By interacting with sulfur, silver disrupts the structural and functional integrity of protein molecules. With their structural and functional integrity disrupted they can no longer function. When proteins are no longer able to function the organism (i.e. the bacteria, virus, fungus, etc) is also unable to function and it quickly dies. A study published in the Journal of Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2008 Apr; 74(7): 2171–2178) found that among other organisms, silver ions can dramatically reduce the number and function of some Staph and Strep bacterial species. This is why many people extoll the virtues of silver in treating a wide range of infections including bronchitis, bladder infections, impetigo, gonorrhea, syphilis, etc.”

But acccording to WebMD, “silver has no known function in the body and is not an essential mineral supplement”. The website goes on to say colloidal silver products are “misbranded”, as they are not FDA-approved. There are no FDA-approved OTC products that contain colloidal silver, and there is very little evidence that colloidal silver actually works.

That being said, a lot of people still use it as a remedy to treat the disorders and diseases mentioned above. Colloidal silver can kill certain germs, as it binds to and destroys them. Whether or not it can counteract the serious problems above remains to be seen. If you are taking colloidal silver, it’s vital that you’re aware of this information.

“In terms of use of colloidal silver in pregnancy, some have postulated that colloidal silver can aid in promoting fetal growth. Some also postulate that use ofcolloidal silver can aid in promoting an easier delivery and a quicker postpartum recovery,” shares Abdur-Rahman. And there are thousands of anecdotal stories of women curing and treating their H. pylori infections during pregnancy, too. “There have been no studies however that bare these claims out; and given that colloidal silver has been proven to disrupt normal amino acid and protein function, many argue that it’s use can in fact be detrimental in pregnancy. Given that proteins carryout the majority of an organism’s (including human being’s) major functions, and given that a fetus growing and developing in-utero depends upon properly functioning proteins to facilitate normal growth and development; many advise against using colloidal silverduring pregnancy. Additionally, some studies have found a possible link between exposure to silver during pregnancy and the development of birth defects involving the face, neck and ears. In fairness though, these studies didn’t examine pregnant patients taking colloidal silver during pregnancy. Instead, they examined the rates of these birth defects involving the head, neck and ears in women living in communities with higher levels of elemental silver in their drinking water and compared the rates of these same birth defects in women living in communities with lower levels of elemental silver in the drinking water. These studies did however find that the risk of birth defects involving the ears, head and neck were higher in pregnant women living in communities with higher levels of elemental silver in the drinking water.”

A lot of people who have taken colloidal silver have discovered that it benefitted them. They found relief from infections and illness, so they continue to take it. But what can you do if you’re pregnant? Can you continue taking colloidal silver, or should you stop its use, as is recommended with the majority of medications and supplements?

Experts tend to be fairly conflicted about the use of colloidal silver during pregnancy.

READ MORE: Wine During Pregnancy: What Europe Allows

According to WebMD, the supplement is “LIKELY UNSAFE” for using during pregnancy. This includes oral and topical application, as well as IV injection. The site states that an increase in silver levels can lead to abnormal fetal development in the necks, faces, and ears of babies. Silver buildup has also been known to cause bluish discolorations of the skin, a condition known as argyria. If silver gets into the vital organs, it can cause serious organ damage. The MayoClinic and the National institutes of Health also back up these statements.

However, a few doctors claim that colloidal silver during pregnancy is NOT a health risk. Dr. Robert O. Becker, MD from the Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York, claims that a silver deficiency can lead to reduced immune function. He claims that colloidal silver can have many benefits to the human body, killing off a wide range of pathogens WITHOUT any side effects.

While it’s true that colloidal silver does help to kill of germs– it bonds with the pathogens and effectively “suffocates” them, there is very little clinical evidence to support the theory that colloidal silver offers real benefits. It’s possible that science just hasn’t caught up though. Considering the warnings given by the experts and doctors at WebMD, the MayoClinic, and the NIH, it’s best to talk to your doctor before giving it a try.

 

About the author

andy

Some people get lucky and are born with fit, toned bodies. Andy Peloquin is not one of those people... Fitness has come hard for him, and he's had to work for it. His trials have led him to becoming a martial artist, an NFPT-certified fitness trainer, and a man passionate about exercise, diet and healthy living. He loves to exercise--he does so six days a week--and loves to share his passion for fitness and health with others.

1 Comment

  • Did not appreciate the link to wine during pregnancy going to a popover window showing pornographic cartoon advertisement for a porn website before going to the related linked article. Clean up your act!

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